From a personal interest in the nature of aggres­sion and fighting spirit, director Eline Flipse inter­views and films prac­ti­tioners of different martial arts, from kick­boxing to kung fu. She follows them during work­outs and bouts, also abroad: a former karate cham­pion travels to China and a sword­fighter to Japan, both to visit admired masters. Martial art is some­thing cultural’, the Chinese master says. Fighting only consists of barbaric moves. That is for riffraff.’ This is why Jan Geyteman and Wim Keyl try to use martial art to keep young­sters on the rails. But martial art does not bring universal happi­ness. I’m a kind of robot’, profes­sional kick­boxer Vincent Vielvoye comments. His mother says he gets one year older with every bout. And a candid former martial artist describes the role that the sport, with its emphasis on self-control, played when his ex-girl­friend was killed. You might say that I’ve reached the highest level of self-control.’

Credits

Director
Set geluid
Sound Design
Production company
Scarabeefilms
TV company
Boeddhistische Omroep Stichting
Distributor NL
Cinema Delicatessen

Title: Eat Your Enemy
Year: 2005
Duration : 1 hour, 22 minutes
Category: Long Documentary
Edition: NFF 2005

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